Basic Sauces and their Derivatives

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: How to Prepare 5 Basic Sauce and Derivatives

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Let’s start with a brief introduction to the basic sauces and their derivatives guide, the five basic sauces used in French cuisine. Other derivative sauces are sauces that are diversified with different ingredients and flavors after the main sauce is prepared.

What are Basic Sauces and Preparation of Derivative Sauces:

The 5 Basic Sauces of the French:

  • Béchamel Sauce: (made from butter, flour, and milk) Béchamel is often the basis for more complex sauces such as white sauce, morning sauce, and soubise sauce. Béchamel can also be added to dishes such as gratins, pork medallions, and even mac and cheese.
  • Veloute Sauce (Velouté): (royal and light Velouté is found in Chicken Wellington, various pasta dishes, and other chicken dishes.
  • Espagnole Sauce: (made from roux, brown broth, mirepoix and tomato ) Espagnole can be used in beef dishes, chicken dishes and mushroom dishes.
  • Tomato Sauce (Sauce Tomat): (short for “tomato sauce” and can be used in a wide variety of ingredients. Tomato sauce can be used just about anywhere: spaghetti, lasagna, cavatelli, chicken parmesan, casseroles, soups, pizza, you name it!
  • Hollandaise Sauce: (made from butter, tempered egg yolks and lemon juice) Hollandez is found in dishes such as Eggs Benedict, cooked salmon and poutine. It’s also a classic pairing with asparagus.
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives:
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives:

Preparation of Béchamel & Derivative Sauces:

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Cream Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Cream Sauce

Cream Sauce (Derivative Sauce of Béchamel Sauce):

Cream sauce, or Beurre blanc, is a classic heavy cream French sauce, classically made using bechamel, cream, and lemon, but with shallots, vinegar or white wine, and lemon juice to enhance flavor. You can use this silky sauce by pouring it over fish or chicken. To make a classic béchamel, first prepare ro͞o (roux / roux) using butter, flour and milk. Then you have it ready by adding lemon juice, zest and cream.

Cream Sauce Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons of unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour
  • 1 glass of milk
  • 1 ¾ glass of cream
  • 1 clove of garlic, grated with a microplane
  • ⅓ cup of freshly grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
  • 1 tablespoon of chopped fresh parsley
  • salt and fresh ground black pepper

In Which Meals Is Cream Sauce Used?

It can be served with pasta or as the basis for many other dishes. You can use this sauce for almost any type of pasta. Any pasta with a sauce-holding surface is suitable for cream sauce. Especially the wide and thick shape of the fettuccine pasta allows you to get the maximum amount of sauce in every bite.

Finally: You can also use this sauce for your favorite cooked vegetables, such as grilled chicken or shrimp, and protein. In addition, this cream sauce can serve as a base for other dishes such as baked pasta and similar lasagna.

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Cheddar Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Cheddar Sauce

Cheddar Sauce (Derivative Sauce of Béchamel Sauce):

Before you prepare the cheddar sauce, you can prepare the ro͞o (roux) first by using butter, flour and milk, and add the cheese to the derivative sauce.

Cheddar Sauce Ingredients:

3 tablespoons of butter
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 ½ cups milk (or light cream)
½ teaspoon of salt
¼ teaspoon dry mustard
⅛ teaspoon ground black pepper (or white pepper)
1 cup shredded cheddar cheese (mild or sharp)

In Which Meals Is Cheddar Sauce Used?

Use this classic cheddar cheese sauce on broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, or other vegetables. It’s also perfect for pasta and makes an easy pasta sauce that we guarantee everyone will absolutely 100% like. You can also use it in rice, chips or other snacks and meals that you want to have extra cheese in, or you can use it as a dip.

Finally: It can be used as a sauce on baked cheese macarons, baked broccoli and spicy potatoes, hot or cold chicken or turkey sandwiches, beef burgers or meat dishes.

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Mornay Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Mornay Sauce

Mornay Sauce (Derivative Sauce of Bechamel Sauce):

A cheese sauce made in the same way as a classic bechamel but with the addition of grated cheese. Low-heat béchamel sauce with gruyere cheese, Emmental (also known as Swiss cheese), or feta cheddar cheese—melting cheeses work, but these three are classics. Parmesan cheese, mozzarella, or a combination of different cheeses are also popular options. Start by preparing the ro͞o (roux) using butter, flour and milk for the Mornay sauce, adding cheese, nutmeg and spices to it.

Mornay Sauce Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons of unsalted butter
  • 4 tablespoons of all-purpose flour
  • 2 glasses of whole milk
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon of cheddar cheese
  • ⅛ teaspoon of grated nutmeg
  • 1 ½ cup of grated cheese
  • Freshly ground black pepper or white pepper

In Which Meals Is Mornay Sauce Used?

Mornay Sauce works best in rich dishes. Use Mornay sauce to add a cheesy ingredient to vegetable, meat, pasta or rice casseroles. You can basically use it as a base sauce for macaroni and cheese or for other pasta-derived dishes like ravioli (filled fresh pasta).

Instead of heavy cream: Instead of just heavy (heavy) cream, you can use Mornay sauce. Combining with greens such as cabbage, baby spinach gives very good results.

Finally: You can add Mornay sauce as the finishing touch on a Croque madame or Croque monsieur, or use it on grilled cauliflower, baked salmon, or sautéed vegetables.

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Nantua Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Nantua Sauce

Nantua Sauce (Derivative Sauce of Bechamel Sauce):

This version of Nantua sauce, a classic seafood sauce, is made by mixing shrimp with butter and cream into a basic béchamel sauce. However, it is traditionally made from crayfish.

Nantua sauce is delicious with fish and seafood, especially all shellfish.

Nantua Sauce Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons of unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour
  • 1 glass of milk
  • ½ cup cream
  • 1 cup shrimp or shellfish (skinned, chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon sweet paprika powder
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

In Which Meals Is Nantua Sauce Used?


Sauces are liquid or semi-liquid ingredients served with food to add moisture and flavor to the dish.

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Velouté Preparation of Sauce Derivative Sauces:

Velouté Sauce – Basic French Sauce

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Bercy Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Bercy Sauce

Bercy Sauce (Derivative Sauce of Velouté Sauce):

Bercy Sauce Ingredients:

500 ml fish velouté
¼ cup of white wine
2 tablespoons chopped shallots
1 tablespoon parsley (chopped)
1 tablespoon of butter
Lemon juice (enough)

In Which Meals Is Veloute Sauce Used?

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Allemande Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Allemande Sauce

Allemande Sauce (Velouté Sauce’s Derivative Sauce):

Allemande Sauce Ingredients:

  • 2 cups veal velouté
  • ¼ cup cream
  • 1 egg yolk
  • sea salt and freshly ground white pepper (according to your taste)

In Which Meals Is Allemande Sauce Used?

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Supreme Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Supreme Sauce

Supreme Sauce (Velouté Sauce’s Derivative Sauce):

Suprême sauce is a classic and popular “derivative sauce” of French cuisine. The mother sauce is made from Velouté, then thickened with cream.

Suprême sauce is a finished sauce made by fortifying chicken velouté sauce with heavy cream. It is a luxurious sauce that is the ideal accompaniment to sautéed chicken. Serve alongside grilled asparagus or roasted vegetables for an elegant dinner.

Suprême sauce is also the basis from which a number of other classic sauces are made; and therefore also called secondary base or mother sauce. Ivory sauce is the basis of creamy mushroom sauce or aurora sauce.

If you don’t have chicken velouté on hand, you can’t make these sauces. It’s not that hard, since you’re using chicken broth, making a roux from plain butter and flour, and then adding it to heated chicken broth and thickening it. You can use it by backing up in separate containers, or you can buy ready-made chicken stock. But doing it every time will give better results.

Supreme Sauce Ingredients:

  • 500 ml chicken velouté
  • 1 glass of cream
  • 1 tablespoon of butter
  • sea salt, freshly ground white pepper
  • lemon juice (1 tablespoon or as much as you like)

In Which Meals Is Supreme Sauce Used?

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Aurora Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Aurora Sauce

Aurora Sauce (Velouté Sauce’s Derivative Sauce):

Aurora Sauce Ingredients:

  • 300 ml allemande sauce
  • ½ tablespoon of tomato puree or tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon of malt vinegar
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper

In Which Meals Is Aurora Sauce Used?

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Cardinal Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Cardinal Sauce

Cardinal Sauce (Velouté Sauce’s Derivative Sauce):

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Cardinal sauce is a classic French sauce with a distinctive red color that comes from lobster oil and paprika. In Le Guide Culinaire, Auguste Escoffier listed the main ingredients: Béchamel sauce, fish stock, truffle reduction, cream, lobster oil and paprika.

Cardinal Sauce Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon of plain butter
  • 2 tablespoons of finely chopped shallots
  • 2 tablespoons of white wine
  • 1 glass of cream
  • 40 ml ground beef stock (100 ml liquid-reduced concentrate)
  • ¼ cup of chopped tomatoes
  • a pinch of red pepper powder
  • salt, enough
  • ½ tablespoon chervil (chopped)

In Which Meals Is Cardinal Sauce Used?

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Espagnole Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Espagnole Sauce

Preparation of Espagnole Sauce Derivative Sauces:

Espagnole is a classic brown sauce made from mirepoix and tomatoes and thickened with roux, typically in the form of brown meat stock. Where do you think the name for this Espagnole came from, given that the sauce is of French origin? According to “Alan Davidson” in The Oxford Companion to Food, in Espagnole, “His name has nothing to do with Spain, just as his counterpart, Allemande, has nothing to do with Germany. It is generally believed that the terms were chosen that way in the eyes of the French, as the Germans were. Germans are blonde and Spaniards are brown.

Espagnole sauce is one of the French cuisine sauces prepared by adding bone stock and roasted flour and butter (roux). This sauce was used to make traditional demi-glace, but in modern professional kitchens, demi-glace is now made by boiling and reducing beef broth.

Espagnole Sauce Ingredients:

  • 1 small carrot, coarsely chopped
  • 1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons white flour
  • 4 cups hot beef stock or reconstituted beef demi-glas concentrate*
  • 2 tablespoons tomato puree or 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 3 large garlic clove, coarsely chopped
  • 1 stalk celery, coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon whole black pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Chasseur Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Chasseur Sauce

Chasseur Sauce (Hunter Sauce – Derivative Sauce of Espagnole Sauce)

Casseur with Gravy is the perfect sauce to serve with wild game, including rabbit, venison, and wild poultry, it’s also great for beef, pork, or chicken. Chasseur is the French word for “hunter” and hence its name is also used as Hunter Sauce.

Chasseur sauce was invented in the 1600s by the honored French Duke Phillippe De Mornay, when he was Governor of Saumur, a historic town in western France between the Loire. If the name Mornay sounds familiar to you, it is the developer of Mornay Sauce, a béchamel sauce with added grated Gruyere cheese, also invented by Duke. He even invented the béchamel sauce, Lyonnaise sauce, and Porto sauce, making him a highly creative nobleman.

Chasseur Sauce Ingredients: (Chasör Sauce – Hunter Sauce)

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 10 mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 shallot finely chopped
  • ½ cup tomato sauce or 2 cups chopped tomatoes
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 tablespoons cognac or brandy
  • 1 glass Espagnole sauce
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Chasseur In Which Dishes Is Sauce Used?

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Chattobirian Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Chattobirian Sauce

Chattobirian Sauce: Chateaubriand (Derivative Sauce of Espagnole Sauce)

Named after the French romantic novelist and statesman Francois Rene Vicomte de Chateaubriand (1768 – 1848), the recipe was created by its chef, Montmireil. Most people think of chateaubriand as just a piece of meat, but that’s not the case.

This is a recipe that most food historians disagree on. However, the tenderloin is the portion of the beef most often used in this recipe.

Satobiryan Sauce Ingredients: (Chateaubriand)

  • 3 tablespoons butter, divided
  • ⅓ cup shallots, chopped
  • 8 mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced
  • 1 glass of dry white wine
  • 2 glasses of Espagnole sauce
  • 1 tablespoon of lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon of dried tarragon
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Bordelaise Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Bordelaise Sauce

Bordelaise Sauce (Derivative Sauce of Espagnole Sauce)

Bordelaise sauce is a classic French sauce that uses red wine from the Bordeaux region in Southwest France. It’s rich and flavorful, so it goes well with a simple grilled steak or slow-baked roast or braised beef. Just adding a small amount of Bordelaise sauce to the meat is enough to liven it up. This tangy and savory red wine sauce makes a great accompaniment to baked fries, too.

Traditionally, this sauce has to be made using a Bordeaux wine, but it’s hard to find anywhere as these are some of the most expensive wines in the world. Therefore, instead of a Bordeaux wine, a top quality dry red wine will do the job. These types of French wines are typically made with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, and Malbec grapes, and it would be great to make this sauce with wines made with these grapes.

Remember, the better your wine, the better this sauce will be. We recommend using a wine to drink with your meal; You will only need a glass or more of red wine for the sauce, and you can drink the rest while you eat.

Bordelaise Sauce Ingredients: (Sauce Claret Red)

  • 1 glass of dry red wine
  • 2 medium shallots, finely chopped
  • ¼ teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 cups espagnole sauce or demi-glace sauce or bone stock
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper, just enough
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Duxelles Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Duxelles Sauce

Robert Sauce: (Derivative Sauce of Espagnole Sauce)

Sauce Robert is a brown mustard sauce made from onions, mustard, and white wine, finished with a simple demi-glas. French sauce is an ideal accompaniment to grilled pork and other meat dishes, but you can also enjoy it on roasted vegetables.

This is a compound sauce, meaning it uses one of its ingredients, the basic (main) sauce. We recommend using your own homemade demi-glace sauce. Demi-glace starts with Espagnole sauce (brown sauce) as the base sauce. The main ingredient in Espagnole sauce is brown beef broth, which takes a lot of time from start to finish. If you have time, you can make Robert sauce by making your own stock, brown sauce, and demi-glace sauce.

Robert Sauce Ingredients:

  • ½ teaspoon of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 2 spoonful butter
  • ½ cup onion (chopped)
  • 1 glass of white wine
  • 1 quart half-glaze
  • 2 teaspoons of dry mustard

Duxelles Sauce: (Derivative Sauce of Espagnole Sauce)

Mushroom Duxelles (pronounced duck-SELL) is an intensely flavored combination of finely chopped mushrooms, shallots, and fresh herbs, such as thyme or parsley, slowly cooked to a pasty consistency. Originating in France and named after the Marquis d’Uxelles, this mushroom seasoning is traditionally used in the preparation of Beef Wellington, but is frequently used to flavor soups and sauces, as well as to stuff omelets and ravioli. It also pairs well with crostini or toast on snacks. It can also be used as a flavor enhancer for mashed potatoes or mushroom-centered pasta dishes.

Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Duxelles Sauce
Basic Sauces and their Derivatives: Duxelles Sauce

Duxelles Sauce Ingredients:

  • 250gr porcini mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons of unsalted butter
  • 1 shallot onion
  • ½ cup dry white wine
  • ¼ cup espagnole sauce
  • ½ tablespoon of white wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon of fresh thyme
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preparation of Tomato Derivative Sauces:

Creole Sauce: (Derivative Sauce of Tomato Sauce)

Temel Sos ve Türevleri: Creole Sos
Temel Sos ve Türevleri: Creole Sos

Spanish Romesco Sos (İspanyol Sosu): (Domates Sos’un Türev Sosu)

Romesco, kızarmış badem ve ekmekle püre haline getirilmiş ve koyulaştırılmış kömürleşmiş domates ve kavrulmuş kırmızı biberden oluşan zengin bir İspanyol sosudur. Çiğ sarımsak, sirke, şili tozu veya kırmızı pul biber ilavesiyle tatlar daha da keskinleştirilir.

Temel Sos ve Türevleri: Spanish – Romesco Sos
  • 2 cups tomato sauce.
  • ½ cup mushrooms (sliced)
  • ½ cup onion (chopped)
  • ¼ cup green pepper (chopped)
  • 1 clove of garlic (minced)
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • tabasco sauce (to taste)

Milanaise Sauce (Milanes Sauce): (Derivative Sauce of Tomato Sauce)

Neapolitan Sauce (Neapolitan Sauce): (Derivative Sauce of Tomato Sauce)

Bolognese Sauce: (Derivative Sauce of Tomato Sauce)

Preparation of Dutch Derivatives Sauces:

Dutch Sauce

Bernaise Sauce: (Derivative Sauce of Hollande Sauce)

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